exhibition

Exhibition of the Camden Town Group and Others

Work of the English Post Impressionists, Cubists and others
ID: 618, Status: completed
Exhibition period:
Dec 16, 1913‒Jan 14, 1914
Type:
group
Organizing Bodies:
Currency:
s (Great Britain Pound (in Shilling))
Ticket Price:
free entry
Quickstats
Catalogue Entries: 190
Artists: 36
Gender: female: 8, male: 26
Nationalities: 6
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Date Title City Venue Type
Date Title City Venue # of common Artists
Mar‒Apr 1914 The First Exhibition of Works by Members of The London Group London Goupil Gallery 26 artists
Mar 1915 The Second Exhibition of Works by Members of the London Group London Goupil Gallery 20 artists
Nov‒Dec 1915 Third Exhibition of Works by Members of the London Group London Goupil Gallery 13 artists
Dec 1912 The Third Exhibition of the Camden Town Group London Carfax Gallery 11 artists
Dec 1911 The Second Exhibition of the Camden Town Group London Carfax Gallery 11 artists
Jun 1911 The First Exhibition of the Camden Town Group London Carfax Gallery 11 artists
Oct 12, 1913‒Jan 16, 1914 Post-Impressionist and Futurist Exhibition London Doré Gallery 17 artists
May 8‒Jun 20, 1914 Twentieth Century Art. A Review of Modern Movements London Whitechapel Art Gallery 28 artists
Jun 10, 1915 Vorticist Exhibition London Doré Gallery 6 artists
May 1‒15, 1912 Exposition de Quelques Indépendants Anglais Paris Galerie H. Barbazanges 5 artists
spring/1915 Fifty-Third Exhibition of Modern Picture by the New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 14 artists
Dec 1915 Fifty-Fourth Exhibition of Modern Picture by the New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 12 artists
Winter 1914 Fifty-second Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 12 artists
summer/1913 Forty-ninth Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 12 artists
Jun‒Jul 1914 Fifty-first Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 12 artists
winter/1913 Fiftieth Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 11 artists
Oct 5‒Dec 31, 1912 Second Post-Impressionist Exhibition. British, French and Russian Artists London Grafton Galleries 5 artists
Winter 1911 Forty-Sixth Exhibition of Modern Pictures by the New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 10 artists
winter/1909 Forty-Second Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 9 artists
Oct 1911 Watercolours by Douglas Fox Pitt and Walter Taylor London Carfax Gallery 2 artists
Jun 1912 Paintings by Ethel Sands and A. H. Hudson London Carfax Gallery 2 artists
Jan 1913 Paintings by Spencer F. Gore and Harold Gilman London Carfax Gallery 2 artists
Summer 1911 Forty-fifth Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 7 artists
May 1913 Paintings by Lucien Pissarro London Carfax Gallery 2 artists
Winter 1910 Forty-Fourth Exhibition of Modern Pictures by the New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 10 artists
summer/1910 Forty-Third Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 8 artists
Summer 1912 Forty-seventh Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 6 artists
winter/1912 Forty-eighth Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 5 artists
May 22, 1909 Forty-First Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 6 artists
Nov‒Dec 1906 Thirty-Seventh Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries in Dering Yard 4 artists
Oct‒Dec 1913 The Goupil Gallery Salon London Goupil Gallery 7 artists
Jul‒Aug 7, 1911 The London Salon of the Allied Artists' Association. Fourth Year London Royal Albert Hall 16 artists
Jun‒Jul 1906 Thirty-Sixth Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries in Dering Yard 3 artists
spring/1908 Fortieth Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries in Dering Yard 3 artists
autumn/1907 Thirty-Ninth Exhibition of Modern Pictures by the New English Art Club London Galleries in Dering Yard 2 artists
May‒Jun 1907 Thirty-eighth Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries in Dering Yard 2 artists
Jul‒Aug 8, 1908 The London Salon of the Allied Artists' Association. 1st year London Royal Albert Hall 12 artists
Jul 1909 The London Salon of the Allied Artists' Association: 2nd year London Royal Albert Hall 6 artists
Oct 18‒Nov 25, 1905 Salon d'Automne. 3e Exposition Paris Grand Palais des Champs Elysées 4 artists
Oct 6‒Nov 15, 1906 Salon d'Automne. 4e Exposition Paris Grand Palais des Champs Elysées 3 artists
Opening Hours
mon - sat: 10am - 8pm; sun: 2.30pm - 5pm
Catalogue
Exhibition of the Camden Town Group and Others. 41913.
Printed by: Pell and Sons, Typs., Brighton, nr. of pages: 29.
Holding Institution: Victoria & Albert National Art Library
Catalogue Price
0,083
Preface
– Henry D. Roberts: Notice, p. 3-4
– J. B. Manson: Intruduction Rooms I.-II., p. 5-8
– Percy Wyndham Lewis: Room III. (The Cubist Room), p. 9-12

"NOTICE.
It has been somewhat difficult to find a title for this exhibition. That given to it–" Work of English Post lmpressionists and Cubists "– is hardly sufficiently explanatory, as there are many works exhibited which do not come under either of these titles. It is, however, sufficiently indicative of the general tendency of the exhibition.
The Fine Arts Committee have contented themselves with inviting the Camden Town Group to form the exhibition, and are not responsible for the selection or arrangement, which has been undertaken by the Camden Town Group, acting through Mr. Spencer F. Gore.
Mr. J. B. Manson and Mr. Percy Wyndham Lewis have been good enough to write an introduction to the catalogue, but the Fine Arts
Committee obviously are not responsible for the opinions therein stated.
The exhibition will be open from December 16th to January 14th, 1914; on week-days from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., and on Sundays from 2.30 to 5 p.m. Admission is free. [p. 3]
The exhibits are for sale. A deposit of 10 per cent. must be paid by the purchaser of a picture at the time of purchase, and the balance paid before the work is removed.
No picture can be removed until the exhibition is finally closed.
The copyright of all works exhibited is reserved to the respective artists, unless special arrangements to the contrary are made at the time of purchase.
Persons desirous of becoming purchasers will receive all requisite information on application to
HENRY D: ROBERTS, Director.“, p. 3-4


„INTRODUCTION. ROOMS I.-II.
By J. B. MANSON.
Mr. Walter Sickert can scarcely have imagined some eight years ago, when he instituted his Saturday „At Homes" in the Studio at 19 Fitzroy Street, that he was thereby paving the way for the Camden Town Group.
However, finding himself in these days the innocent progenitor of so spirited a descendant, he assumes even this responsibility with his usual light-hearted grace. Sickert may not have foreseen the Camden Town Group as the outcome of his early experiment, but he did then realise the necessity of providing some scope for the free expression of newer artistic thought.
The right of free speech in art has been a peculiarly unsatisfied need in England, where art has meant for the public the sentimental anecdote produced according to the best recipes evolved to suit the taste of institutions eminently British.
Eight years ago the then revolutionaries, the New English Art Club, had already found its respectable level; it had reached a point of safety. It was too tired or too wise to venture further.
[p. 5]
But self-complacency, whether new English or old, has never won the respect of tumultuous youth ; not have brain and brawn been bred on sponge cakes even when disguised in the pink and chocolate of the officially distinguished.
There is no limit in art to development or to new ideas. New modes of expression, whatever their value, must and will be heard. For this reason, the movement, small and imperceptible at first, became the vehicle for the expression of the new ideas, hot from the mint, which agitated the impressionable minds of these younger English artists who had escaped being cast in the Royal Academic mould. Wirh Mr. Spencer Gore and Harold Gilman in league, there was no restraining the forward movement wherever it might lead ; for the alert curiosity, the interest displayed by those artists in every new aspect of art which might be utilised for the more complete and more intimate realisation of emotion made inevitably for advancement. So the movement kept alive and grew. Wiith Mr. Lucien Pissarro as a leader, the link with traditional art through Camille Pissarro, Corot, and Claude, was complete. The influence of Mr. Pissarro made itself immediately felt. The „Art
[p. 6]
Homes" of the society became widely known. The younger generation found there work which kindled its curiosity, or stimulated its interest in life. Distinguished foreign visitors made the Studio in Fitzroy Street a meeting place, regarding it as an oasis in the desert of British Art. There they discovered the modern movement in art, whose very existence in this country was unsuspected, so had it been ignored or inadequately recognised by official art institutions.
The need of appeal to a wider public became at last a necessity. In 1911 the Camden Town Group was formed, and held its first exhibition in the Carfax Gallery. The Group at that time represented a coherent homogenous school of expression ; differing in degree as to the work of individual members, but with the unity of common aim. The exhibition, small and select as it was, attracted considerable attention, and other exhibitions followed . It was then felt to be desirable to extend the means of free expression thus won to other artists who ere experimenting with new methods, who were seeking or who had found means of expressing their ideas, their visions, their conceptions in their own way. For this reason, the London Group is being formed.
[p. 7]
More eclectic in its constitution, it will no linger limit istsef to the cultivation of one single school of thought, but will offer hospitality to all manner of artistic expression provided it has the quality of sincere personal conviction. The Group promises to become one of the most influential and most significant of art movements in England.
To conceive a limit to artistic development is an admission of one's own limitations. Nothing is finally right in art ; the rightness is purely personal, anf for the artist himself. So, in the London Group, which is to be the latest development of the original Fitzroy Street Group, all modern methods may find a home. Cubism meets Impressionism, Futurism and Sickertism join hands and are not ashamed, the motto of the Group being that sincerity of conviction has a right of expression.
A live society in which is room for manifold schools of thought, in which individuality and personal feeling have scope to develop is the object of the London Group. It is well, perhaps, that the vital qualities in modern art should be concentrated in one definite group instead of being scattered in the medley of modern exhibitions.
J. B. Mason“


„Room III. (THE CUBIST ROOM)
BY PERCY WYNDHAM LEWIS.
Futurism, one of the alternative terms for modern painting, was patented in Milan. It means the Present, with the Past rigidly excluded, and flavoured strongly with H. G. Wells' dreams of the dance of monstrous and arrogant machinery, to the frenzied clapping of men's hands. But futurism will never mean anything else. in painting, than the art practised by the five or six Italian painters grouped beneath Marinetti's influence. Gino Severini, the foremost of them, has for subject matter the night resorts of Paris. This, as subject matter, is obviously not of the future. For we all foresee, in a century or so, everybody being put to bed at 7 o'clock in the evening by a state-nurse. Therefore the Pan Pan at the Monaco will be, for Ginos of the future, an
archaistic experience.
Cubism means, chiefly, the art, superbly severe and so far morose, of those who have taken the genius of Cézanne as a starting point, and organised the character of the works he threw up in his indiscriminate labour. It is the reconstruction of a simpler earth, left as choked and muddy fragment by him. Cubism
[p. 9]
includes much more than this, but the „cube“ is implicit in that master's painting.
To be done with terms and tags, Post Impressionism is an insipid and pointless name invented by a journalist, which has been naturally ousted by the better word „Futurism“ in public debate on modern art.
This room is chiefly composed of works by a group of painters, consisting of Frederick Etchells, Cuthbert Hamilton, Edward Wadsworth, C. R. W. Nevinson, and the writer of this foreword. These painters are not accidentally associated here, but form a vertiginous, but not exotic island in the placid and respectable archipelago of English art. This formation is undeniably of volcanic matter and even origin ; for it appeared suddenly above the waves following certain seismic shakings beneath the surface. It is very closely knit and admirably adapted to withstand the imperturbable Britannic breakers which roll pleasantly against its sides.
Beneath the Past and the Future the most sanguine would hardly expect a more different skeleton to exist than that respectively of ape and man. Man with an
[p. 10]
aeroplane is still merely a bad bird. But a man who passes his days amid the rigid lines of houses, a plague of cheap ornamentation, noisy street locomotion, the Bedlam of the press, will evidently possess a different habit of vision to a man living amongst the lines of a landscape. As to turning the back, most wise men, Egyptians, Chinese, or what not, have remained where they found themselves, their appetite for life sufficient to reconcile them, and allow them to create significant things. Suicide is the obvious course for the dreamer, who is a man without an anchor of sufficient weight.
The work of this group of artists for the most part underlines such geometric bases and structure of life, and they would spend their energies rather in showing a different skeleton and abstraction than formerly could exist, than a different degree of hairiness or dress. All revolutionary painting to-day has in common the rigid reflections of steel and stone in the spirit of the artist ; that desire for stability as though a machine were being built to fly or kill with ; an alienation from the traditional photographer's trade and realisation of the value of colour and form as such independently of what reconisable
[p.11]
form it covers or encloses. People are invited, in short, to entirely change their idea of the painter's mission, and penetrate, deferentially, with him into a transposed universes, as abstract as, though different to, the musicians.
I will not describe individually the works of my colleagues. In No. 165 of E. Wadsworth, No. 161 of Cuthbert Hamilton, Nos. 169 and 181 of F. Etchells, No. 174 of C. R. W. Nevison, they are probably best represented.
Hung in this room as well are three drawings by Jacob Epstein, the only great sculptor at present working in England. He finds in the machinery of procreation a dynamo to work the deep attavism of his spirit. Symbolically strident above his work, or in the midst of it, is, like the Pathé cock, a new born baby, with a mystic but puissant crow. His latest work opens up a region of great possibilities, and new creation. David Bomberg's painting of a platform announces a colourists temperament, something between the cold blond of Severini's earlier paintings and Vallotton. The form and subject matter are academic, but the structure of the criss-cross pattern new and extremely interesting.
Wyndham Lewis.“
Catalogue Structure
Prefaces, p. 3-12
"Catalogue of Pictures"
– First Room. Oils, Etc., cat. no. 1-79, p. 13-18
– Middle Room. Water Colours, Etc., cat. no. 80-145, p. 19-23
– Third Room. Oils, Etc., cat. no. 147-192, p. 24-29
"Index to Artists"
Note
- Catalogue: "One Penny", cover page
- "Fourth Edition", title page

+Gender Distribution (Pie Chart)

+Artists’ Age at Exhibition Start(Bar Chart)

+Artists’ Nationality(Pie Chart)

+Exhibiting Cities of Artists(Pie Chart)

+Types of Work(Pie Chart)

+Catalogue Entries by Nationality(Pie Chart)

Name Date of Birth Date of Death Nationality # of Cat. Entries
Ethel Sands 1873 1962 GB 6
Laura Sylvia Gosse 1881 1968 GB 6
Mervyn Lawrence 1868 1961 IE 6
Renée Finch 1876 1954 GB 6
Walter Bayes 1869 1956 GB 5
Harald Sund 1876 1940 NO 4
Charles Ginner 1878 1952 GB 6
Robert Polhill Bevan 1865 1925 GB 6
Harold Gilman 1876 1919 GB 6
James Bolivar Manson 1879 1945 GB 6
Spencer Gore 1878 1914 GB 6
Walter Richard Sickert 1860 1942 GB 6
Lucien Pissarro 1863 1944 FR 6
Harold Squire 1881 1959 GB 6
Anna Hope Hudson 1869 1957 US 6
Walter Taylor 1860 1943 GB 6
John Northcote Nash 1893 1977 GB 6
Paul Nash 1889 1946 GB 6
Douglas Fox Pitt 1864 1922 GB 6
James Hamilton Hay 1874 1916 GB 6
Thérèse Lessore 1884 1945 GB 5
William Bernard Adeney 1878 1966 GB 6
William Ratcliffe 1870 1955 GB 6
Malcolm Drummond 1880 1945 GB 6
Stanisława Karłowska 1876 1952 GB 4
R. Duckett 2
M. Ogilvie 1
Jacob Epstein 1880 1959 GB 3
Cuthbert Hamilton 1884 1959 GB 5
Edward Wadsworth 1889 1949 GB 7
Frederick Etchells 1886 1973 GB 5
Fanny Eveleigh 3
David Bomberg 1890 1957 GB 5
Christopher Nevinson 1889 1946 GB 6
Jessie Etchells 1892 1933 GB 3
Wyndham Lewis 1882 1957 GB 6
Recommended Citation: "Exhibition of the Camden Town Group and Others." In Database of Modern Exhibitions (DoME). European Paintings and Drawings 1905-1915. Last modified Dec 30, 2019. https://exhibitions.univie.ac.at/exhibition/618