exhibition

Twentieth Century Art. A Review of Modern Movements


ID: 680, Status: completed
Exhibition period:
May 8‒Jun 20, 1914
Type:
group
Organizing Bodies:
Quickstats
Catalogue Entries: 510
Artists: 135
Gender: female: 40, male: 88
Nationalities: 10
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Date Title City Venue Type
Date Title City Venue # of common Artists
Dec 16, 1913‒Jan 14, 1914 Exhibition of the Camden Town Group and Others Brighton Public Art Galleries 28 artists
Mar 1915 The Second Exhibition of Works by Members of the London Group London Goupil Gallery 24 artists
winter/1913 Fiftieth Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 37 artists
summer/1913 Forty-ninth Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 36 artists
Mar‒Apr 1914 The First Exhibition of Works by Members of The London Group London Goupil Gallery 21 artists
Dec 1915 Fifty-Fourth Exhibition of Modern Picture by the New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 30 artists
Winter 1914 Fifty-second Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 30 artists
Jun‒Jul 1914 Fifty-first Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 32 artists
Winter 1910 Forty-Fourth Exhibition of Modern Pictures by the New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 35 artists
spring/1915 Fifty-Third Exhibition of Modern Picture by the New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 28 artists
winter/1912 Forty-eighth Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 24 artists
Nov‒Dec 1915 Third Exhibition of Works by Members of the London Group London Goupil Gallery 16 artists
Oct 12, 1913‒Jan 16, 1914 Post-Impressionist and Futurist Exhibition London Doré Gallery 20 artists
Summer 1912 Forty-seventh Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 23 artists
Winter 1911 Forty-Sixth Exhibition of Modern Pictures by the New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 27 artists
Summer 1911 Forty-fifth Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 22 artists
Dec 1911 The Second Exhibition of the Camden Town Group London Carfax Gallery 13 artists
May 22, 1909 Forty-First Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 21 artists
winter/1909 Forty-Second Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 21 artists
Oct‒Dec 1913 The Goupil Gallery Salon London Goupil Gallery 23 artists
summer/1910 Forty-Third Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists 21 artists
Jun 1911 The First Exhibition of the Camden Town Group London Carfax Gallery 12 artists
Dec 1912 The Third Exhibition of the Camden Town Group London Carfax Gallery 11 artists
Jun 10, 1915 Vorticist Exhibition London Doré Gallery 10 artists
May 1‒15, 1912 Exposition de Quelques Indépendants Anglais Paris Galerie H. Barbazanges 9 artists
Jul‒Aug 7, 1911 The London Salon of the Allied Artists' Association. Fourth Year London Royal Albert Hall 34 artists
Oct 5‒Dec 31, 1912 Second Post-Impressionist Exhibition. British, French and Russian Artists London Grafton Galleries 11 artists
spring/1908 Fortieth Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries in Dering Yard 11 artists
autumn/1907 Thirty-Ninth Exhibition of Modern Pictures by the New English Art Club London Galleries in Dering Yard 10 artists
May‒Jun 1907 Thirty-eighth Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries in Dering Yard 9 artists
Oct 3, 1912 Exhibition of Pictures by S. J. Peploe, J. D. Fergusson, Joseph Simpson, Anne E. Rice, Jessie Dismorr, Georges Banks, Ethel Wright, C. King, L. Atkinson, Fred. F. Foottet London Stafford Gallery 6 artists
Jul‒Aug 8, 1908 The London Salon of the Allied Artists' Association. 1st year London Royal Albert Hall 30 artists
Jun‒Jul 1906 Thirty-Sixth Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries in Dering Yard 7 artists
Nov‒Dec 1906 Thirty-Seventh Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries in Dering Yard 6 artists
Jan 1914 The Grafton Group. Vanessa Bell, Roger Fry, Duncan Grant. Second Exhibition London Galleries of the Alpine Club 4 artists
Jul 1909 The London Salon of the Allied Artists' Association: 2nd year London Royal Albert Hall 12 artists
Oct‒Nov 1905 Thirty-fifth Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club London Galleries of the Alpine Club 4 artists
Apr 28‒May 19, 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art [Armory Show] Boston Copley Hall 4 artists
Apr‒May 1905 Thirty-Fourth Exhibition of Modern Pictures. New English Art Club Liverpool Royal Institution 3 artists
Oct 1911 Watercolours by Douglas Fox Pitt and Walter Taylor London Carfax Gallery 2 artists
Jun 1912 Paintings by Ethel Sands and A. H. Hudson London Carfax Gallery 2 artists
Jan 1913 Paintings by Spencer F. Gore and Harold Gilman London Carfax Gallery 2 artists
May 1913 Paintings by Lucien Pissarro London Carfax Gallery 2 artists
[1913-1914] Colour Wood Cuts, Water Colours. Portraits, Landscapes London Doré Gallery 2 artists
Mar 24‒Apr 16, 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art [Armory Show] Chicago The Art Institute of Chicago 4 artists
Feb 17‒Mar 15, 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art [Armory Show] New York Armory of the 69th Infantry 5 artists
May 17‒28, 1910 Nus Paris MM. Bernheim-Jeune & Cie 2 artists
Apr 22‒Oct 31, 1909 VIII. Esposizione d'Arte della Città di Venezia Venice Giardini Pubblici 6 artists
May 30‒Oct 1, 1914 Neue Münchener Secession. Erste Ausstellung Munich Galerienstraße 26 2 artists
Aug‒Sep 1913 Neue Kunst. II.Gesamtausstellung Munich Hans Goltz 2 artists
Apr 23‒Oct 31, 1910 IX. Esposizione d'Arte della Città di Venezia Venice Giardini Pubblici 5 artists
Oct 18‒Nov 25, 1905 Salon d'Automne. 3e Exposition Paris Grand Palais des Champs Elysées 5 artists
Apr 12‒Sep 30, 1914 Erste Ausstellung der Freien Secession Berlin Berlin Ausstellungshaus am Kurfürstendamm 208/9 2 artists
Oct 6‒Nov 15, 1906 Salon d'Automne. 4e Exposition Paris Grand Palais des Champs Elysées 4 artists
Feb‒Jun 1915 Terza esposizione Internazionale d'Arte della "Secessione" Rome Palazzo dell'Esposizone 2 artists
May 9‒Nov 2, 1914 Exposition Générale des Beaux-Arts / Salon Triennale Brussels Palais du Cinquantenaire 2 artists
Opening Hours
12pm - 9.30pm
Catalogue
Twentieth Century Art. A Review of Modern Movements. 1914.
Printed by: Penny and Hull, Printers, Leman Street, E., nr. of pages: 35.
Holding Institution: Queen's University Library
Preface
[no author]: Introduction, p. 2-4

INTRODUCTION
The "Twenty Years of British Art" Exhibition, held here in Summer, 1910, showed a review of art as it had developed in this country in the concluding decade of last century and the first of the present century. It showed that artists had moved away from an academic treatment of history, anecdote, and sentimentality, and had gone in search of a more brilliant treatment of light in landscape, of more truly decorative treatments of subject, and of a more intimate treatment of human life generally.

Until the lessons of the French Impressionists had been digested, art here was chiefly concerned with greater naturalism. But modern painters are now no longer concerned to pass on to the public mere impersonal imitations in two-dimensional space of appearances in three-dimensional space. They think that photographic „moving pictures" convey, this much more adequately than they ever can.

The „Twentieth Century Art“ exhibition is concerned with the progress of art, since the absorption of the impressionist teaching, as shown in the work of the younger British artists and of artists of foreign origin working in this country. This work may be diverted in four groups. The first group has been influenced by Mr. Walter Sickert and Mr. Lucien Pissarro. It treats common or sordid scenes on a sprightly manner and excels in a luminous treatment of landscape. Most of the pictures from No. 397 to 450 on West Wall of Upper Gallery, belong to this group. The second group shows the influence of Puvis de Chavannes, Alphose Legros and Mr. Augustus John. It sacrifices the attempt to get the illusion of threedimensional space by the creation of commanding human types ad appropriate attitudes and gestures. The decorative effect thus produced is not merely that of a satisfying „pattern,“ it is too strong for that, but its simplification are distinctly linear. Many of the pictures on the East Wall of the Upper Gallery from No. 326 to No. 368 belong to this group.

The third group owes its origin to a feeling which had begun to appear in the times of the later Impressionists, in the 'eighties and 'nineties of the last century, in the work of [p. 2]

Cézanne. So late was this feeling in being developed here, that in none of the pictures shown in this gallery in 1910 was it expressed. Simplification is noticeable in the work if this group also, but it is that of „designing in volumes.“ The pictures on North Wall of Upper Gallery, No. 304 to No. 317, belong to this group.

In this method of design the artist does not only simplify the outlines and surfaces of masses of form, but simplifies them in their depth also, abandoning the usually accepted perspective if this is necessary to his purpose.

The fourth group has abandoned representation almost entirely. Some members of this group have recently established a „Rebel Art Centre.“ Some of the pictures on West Wall of Lower Gallery, No. 19 to no. 30, belong to this group, and the work of Mr. Bomberg in the Small Gallery.

Some excellent landscape work, in which the luminous quality attained by the Impressionists has been allied to a greater dignity of subject and to more thoughtful design, is shown in the exhibition. It does not attach itself to any of these groups.

A feeling common to the painters, sculptors, and designers represented in this exhibition is that of a compulsion on the artist towards a more personal statement of his relation towards his subject in particular and to life in general than has been expressed in the preceding phases of the development of art; and it may often be noted that one artist, having done in a serious spirit what a good caricaturist does in a humorous spirit, has conveyed the character of his subject without imitating its accidental appearances, while another has presented a creation in pure form disengaged from associations with things seen or remembered.
Modern sculpture does not set out to produce inanimate imitations resembling petrified human beings, but proceeds to give to stone a sort of stony life, and treats other materials according to the same guiding principle. It is in some cases merely a demonstration of the interest of the intersection of planes. It suggests motion by the choice of significant lines rather than by the imitation of the play of muscular action.
In decoration a new style has come, and this shows the first forward move in this country since William Morris and the “arts and crafts” movement, for the “new art” movement of fifteen years ago, though promoted by some able artists on the Continent and in Scotland, accomplished nothing vital in England.

In design this new style shows affinities with Byzantine Art and with much savage art of the present time. It avoids the heavy metallic crudity of the colour schemes of [p. 3]
the mid-Victorian period and the sophisticated timidity of the “art shades” that followed in the eighteen-eighties and ‘nineties.

In painting and decoration the modern movement apparently seeks to preserve the relation of art with some sources of vitality that have been closed to it in preceding phases, with the love of bright colour that is the heritage of almost all human beings, with the remarkable artistic power shown by children before they are spoiled by modern teaching, with the implicit grotesque humour that has been banished by “serious” art for the last hundred years. This humour, which persisted in English art till the caricatures of the Napoleonic period, when real caricature was almost dead. It found almost its only public expression in the halfpenny coloured press.

Modern art, contrary to a common misapprehension of its meaning, does not alienate itself from life, but seeks a closer connection with life-that did the art that preceded it.

In the “Twentieth Century Art” Exhibition the Trustees endeavour to present an adequate review of the work done in this country under the influence referred to above.

They hope that all who are in sympathy with their constant effort to introduce art to democracy will aid them in their endeavour to show that democratic feeling has been introduced to art.”
Additional Information
Other Mediums listed
Note
– "Summer Exhibition", cover and title page
– "Under revision", title page
– "Most of the Exhibits are for sale.", title page
– "The numbering [...] begins on left of turnstile and continues round the walls of the Lower Gallery, including the exhibits lent by the Omega Workshops, Ltd. The stands and screens in floor space follow, then the Small Gallery, and last the Upper Gallery.", title page
– Reproduction of Underground Map of London on last page.
– "1 D.", cover page

+Gender Distribution (Pie Chart)

+Artists’ Age at Exhibition Start(Bar Chart)

+Artists’ Nationality(Pie Chart)

+Exhibiting Cities of Artists(Pie Chart)

+Types of Work(Pie Chart)

+Catalogue Entries by Nationality(Pie Chart)

Name Date of Birth Date of Death Nationality # of Cat. Entries
William Shackleton 1872 1933 GB 3
Howard Somerville 1873 1952 GB 2
Maud Anna Bell 1868 1957 GB 1
Mabel Layng 1881 1937 GB 1
Lilian Gardiner Lancaster 1881 GB 2
Vera Waddington 1886 1954 GB 2
Anne Louise Falkner 1862 1933 GB 1
Horace C. Taylor 1881 1934 GB 7
Louise Pickard 1865 1928 GB 2
Frederick Francis Foottet 1843 1931 GB 3
Vanessa Bell 1879 1961 GB 5
Duncan Grant 1885 1978 GB 7
Thérèse Lessore 1884 1945 GB 4
Philip Sidney Woolf 2
Stanley Cursiter 1887 1976 GB 1
Clarence Evelyn King 1
Vassilieff 1
Helen Saunders 1885 1963 GB 2
Christopher Nevinson 1889 1946 GB 3
William Roberts 1895 1980 GB 8
Edward Wadsworth 1889 1949 GB 2
Frederick Etchells 1886 1973 GB 3
Wyndham Lewis 1882 1957 GB 1
Clare Winsten 3
Amy J. Drucker 1873 1951 GB 1
Vladimir Polunin 1880 1957 RU 1
anonymous: Omega Workshop 6
John Duncan Fergusson 1874 1961 GB 10
Hilda Coltman 2
Stanisława Karłowska 1876 1952 GB 2
Mervyn Lawrence 1868 1961 IE 3
Samuel John Peploe 1871 1935 GB 7
S. Noel Simmons GB 2
C. Maresco Pearce 1874 1964 GB 2
Malcolm Drummond 1880 1945 GB 3
Elinor Mary Darwin 1869 1959 GB 2
Herbert Ashwin Budd 1881 1950 GB 3
Thomas Austen Brown 1859 1924 GB 2
Ethel Walker 1861 1951 GB 3
Agatha Catherine Hall Shore 1878 1950 1
Adrian Paul Allinson 1890 1959 GB 2
Malcolm Milne 1887 1954 GB 2
Albert Lipczinski 1876 1974 PL 4
James Hamilton Hay 1874 1916 GB 2
Wilfred Walter 1882 1958 GB 3
Ethel Wright 1866 1939 GB 2
G. D. Davison 3
Clifford Isaac Addams 1876 1942 US 3
Henri Gaudier-Brzeska 1891 1915 FR 2
Jessie Etchells 1892 1933 GB 3
Walter Dobson 4
Frederick Carter 1885 1967 GB 4
John Copley 1875 1950 GB 4
Rudolf Ihlee 1883 1968 GB 6
John Northcote Nash 1893 1977 GB 4
Paul Nash 1889 1946 GB 4
Harry Becker 1865 1928 GB 1
Maude R. Lousada 2
Elsie McNaught 3
Nora Summers 1892 1948 GB 2
Henry Lamb 1883 1960 GB 17
Vernon Hill 1887 1972 GB 2
Allan Gwynne-Jones 1892 1982 GB 3
Ernest H. R. Collings 2
John Quinton Pringle 1864 1925 GB 3
Jessy C. Hebbert 1
Walter Taylor 1860 1943 GB 3
Douglas Fox Pitt 1864 1922 GB 3
Harold Squire 1881 1959 7
J. M. B. Benson 2
Ursula Tyrwhitt 1878 1966 GB 1
Margaret Hannay 1888 1974 GB 1
Muriel I. Baker 2
Katherine Ollivant GB 1
Colin Unwin Gill 1892 1940 GB 2
H. F. Garrett 3
George Belcher 1875 1947 GB 1
William Edward Arnold-Forster 1885 1951 GB 1
Muriel Fewster GB 2
Hubert D. Schloss 2
Donald Graeme MacLaren 1886 1917 GB 3
Margory Brend 1880 1959 GB 2
William Frederick Mayor 1865 1916 GB 2
David Bomberg 1890 1957 GB 5
Mark Gertler 1891 1939 GB 7
Horace Brodzky 1885 1969 AU 5
Isaac Rosenberg 1890 1918 GB 5
Bernard Meninsky 1891 1950 GB 5
Alfred Aaron Wolmark 1877 1961 GB 3
Moïse Kisling 1891 1953 FR 2
Morris Goldstein 1892 GB 5
Elie Nadelman 1882 1946 PL 3
Jules Pascin 1885 1930 BG 2
Amedeo Modigliani 1884 1920 IT 1
Mark Weiner 2
Jacob Kramer 1892 1962 GB 4
Roger Fry 1866 1934 GB 5
William Bernard Adeney 1878 1966 GB 3
H. Samuel Teed 1883 1916 GB 3
James Dickson Innes 1887 1914 GB 7
Jan Strang 1886 1952 GB 3
Charles Henry Collins Baker 1880 1959 GB 2
Maud Ireland Button 1877 1965 GB 2
John Duncan 1866 1945 GB 2
Ethel Sands 1873 1962 GB 1
John Currie 1883 1914 GB 3
Charles Ginner 1878 1952 GB 3
Maxwell Gordon Lightfoot 1886 1911 GB 5
Darsie Napier Japp 1883 1973 GB 6
Stanley Spencer 1891 1959 GB 3
Adeline M. Fox 1870 1
Derwent Lees 1885 1931 AU 4
Joseph Simpson 1879 1939 GB 1
Anne Estelle Rice 1879 1959 US 2
James Bolivar Manson 1879 1945 GB 4
Laura Sylvia Gosse 1881 1968 GB 3
E. C. Austen Brown 1869 1942 GB 1
Robert Polhill Bevan 1865 1925 GB 4
Harold Gilman 1876 1919 GB 2
William Ratcliffe 1870 1955 GB 3
Spencer Gore 1878 1914 GB 4
Henry Bishop 1868 1939 GB 3
Josephine Mason GB 2
Walter Burrows 2
Walter Richard Sickert 1860 1942 GB 6
Diana White 1868 1950 GB 2
Lucien Pissarro 1863 1944 FR 5
Anna Hope Hudson 1869 1957 US 2
Mary Elizabeth Atkins GB 1
G. L. Kennedy GB 3
Boris Anrep 1883 1969 RU 3
Gwendolen Raverat 1885 1957 GB 1
Manning Pike 2
Julian G. Lousada 1874 1945 GB 2
G. A. Ramsay 3
Recommended Citation: "Twentieth Century Art. A Review of Modern Movements." In Database of Modern Exhibitions (DoME). European Paintings and Drawings 1905-1915. Last modified Dec 4, 2019. https://exhibitions.univie.ac.at/exhibition/680